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San Francisco Allows Recipients Of Johnson & Johnson’s (NYSE: JNJ) Vaccine to Get Supplemental Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE ) Or Moderna Inc. (NASDAQ: MRNA) Dose

San Francisco Department of Public Health, together with Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, has allowed recipients of Johnson & Johnson’s (NYSE: JNJ)  vaccine to take Pfizer (NYSE: PFE) or Moderna (NASDAQ: MRNA) supplements.

San Francisco’s Department of Public Health  announcement

Once a recipient gets the JNJ vaccine dose, they will be fully vaccinated after two weeks. “However, JNJ recipients can make requests to receive a supplemental dose of mRNA vaccine,” City health officials said to CNBC news. The mRNA vaccines help our cells to make proteins or a piece of protein that triggers an immune response in bodies.

On Tuesday, San Francisco health officials explained to reporters that the decision is based on multiple requests by the patients to get extra shots. In addition, the officials reassured the reporters that JNJ was still a highly effective covid -19 vaccine.

SFDPH said that some Americans were looking for places to take more shots of covid 19 vaccines. The Americans think that JNJ is not enough protection towards the delta variant.

JNJ appears to be weaker for the delta variant

Dr. Angela Rasmussen, a virologist at Georgetown University, said she received a booster of the PFE and BioNTechs (NASDAQ: BNTX) vaccine. She got those boosters two months after welcoming her J&J single-dose vaccine.

Rasmussen had concerns about protection against the delta variant. And this was after several studies suggested that a single dose of the Covid-19 vaccine was not enough protection against the delta variant. 

New research has suggested that the JNJ vaccine is not protective against the delta variant and lambda variants. In addition to that, JNJ was more effective against the original virus. Therefore, the researchers said that JNJ recipients should receive a booster of the PFE or mRNA vaccine.

This new research is not aligning with JNJ’s study, which reported the vaccine is more effective against severe disease, delta variant in this case. Instead, the difference is more likely to fuel a debate of mixing and matching shots in the U.S. Delta variant is spreading faster in the U.S. since the time it emerged.

JNJ is yet to respond to any requests to comment on the San Francisco Department of Public Health announcement.

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